Posts Tagged ‘sacroiliac joint’

Tamworth physiotherapist treats sacroiliac joint pain

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

Tamworth Physiotherapist John Williams of Atlas Pain Relief Centre has designed a unique physiotherapy treatment for sacroiliac joint pain.  Sacroiliitis is an inflammation of the sacroiliac joint and is often mistaken for low back pain.  Physiotherapy in Tamworth at the Atlas Pain Relief Centre is proving 99% successful in treating the condition in less than 6 visits.

For this unique Tamworth physiotherapy treatment you need to contact the pain relief clinic.  Tamworth physiotherapist John Williams has been visited by patients from Lincolnshire this week and many more travel a long distance to access this unique physiotherapy treatment for the sacroiliac joint.

Unlike Tamworth chiropractor and Tamworth osteopath treatment for the sacroiliac joint, the Atlas regime does not involve manipulation of the pelvis.

For more details contact reception on 01827 59943 or visit www.atlaspainrelief.co.uk

Tamworth Osteopaths treat sacroiliac joint inflammation.

Monday, June 14th, 2010

John Williams of Tamworth Osteopaths in Tamworth near Lichfield Staffordshire is often asked about sacroiliac joint problems.  Does physiotherapy from a physiotherapist help, does chiropractic treatment from a chiropractor help or does osteopathy from an osteopath help.  The answer is not the profession but in someone who understands the problem and has a successful record in treating this common condition.

What is the sacroiliac joint?

The sacroiliac joint can be found within the pelvic girdle.  We all have two sacroiliac joints which are positioned between the sacrum and the ilia.

As joints are named where bones meet each other, the sacroiliac joint gets its name from the sacrum (sacro) and Ilium (iliac) which can be found each side of your lower back.

The sacrum is a triangular shaped bone which forms the base of your spine and has 5 fused vertebrae.  The Ilium is a flat irregular shaped bone which is found on both left and right sides. At the front of the pelvic girdle the two ilium bones meet at the pubis symphysis.  At the rear the two ilium bones meet the sacrum at the two sacroiliac joints.

The bones of the pelvic girdle are held together by many ligaments but there is movement which occurs at the sacroiliac joints and the pubis symphysis.  As you can imagine when moving, the pelvic girdle comes under immense strain from the legs, which act like long levers.  The two sacroiliac joints at the back and pubis at the front act like expansion joints and dissipate the forces, allowing the bones of the pelvis to absorb the stress.  Without this the pelvis would fracture.

Sacroiliac Joint Function

The sacroiliac joint allows movement between bones of the pelvic girdle.  The movement is not extensive but enough to release the stress on the pelvis.

The sacrum is alleged to have 3 points of axis which enables it to move like a universal joint.  The adjacent SI Joints absorb this movement and allow the spine and pelvis to operate normally.  As the sacrum is wedged shape being thinner below and wider up above, it is designed to wedge between the 2 Ilias when requiring stability of the pelvis.

We therefore have a joint that needs to be able to lock and also move when required.  Take for example a door which has a function of closing and locking and on occasions when required it opens and swings on its hinges.  When the door is operating correctly everything is fine, but if the door sticks it may not be able to move as it should.  The sacroiliac joint is the same because its function is both to allow movement and when required restrict movement.

The problems occur when function is impaired and the SI sticks and gets jammed.

Sacroiliac Joint Inflammation

Sacroiliac joints seem to be prone to inflammation, either the adjacent ligaments can become stretched and inflamed or the joint itself seems to become painful and show signs of inflammation.  Inflammation of the sacroiliac joint is called “sacroiliitis”.   Inflammation is referred to as “itis” and can be found describing many inflammatory conditions.

It is unclear why inflammation of the SIJ occurs but one theory is that inflammation is triggered when the joint sticks and ligaments are stretched during movement.  It matters not what causes this problem as long as it can be resolved.

Symptoms of Sacroiliac Joint inflammation

SIJ symptoms vary in intensity and presentation.  Classic symptoms are:

One sided low back pain (occasionally it can change sides)

Pain when turning in bed

Pain rising from sitting

Pain swinging legs in and out of a car.

Groin pain (which can lead to testicle pain in men)

Radiating pain around the buttock and thigh

Occasionally the SIJ symptoms mimic sciatica which often leads to misdiagnosis.

Treatment of Sacroiliac Joints

Treating the SIJ involves two aspects.  Firstly treating the symptoms of pain and lack of mobility and secondly treating the cause.

Inflammation can be treated with ice and interferential electrotherapy, which is a machine often used by physiotherapists. Massage may make you feel better but will not improve the problem

The cause is more complex and can be from poor biomechanics, twisting and bending, trauma or indeed it can be a leg length difference.  This can cause a misaligned pelvis.

An examination is advised along with a biomechanical assessment to determine causative factors and then treatment can begin.

Atlas Pain Relief Centre in Tamworth and Solihull Birmingham have designed a specific treatment regime for problem sacroiliac joints and have success in less than 6 visits normally.

The  website www.tamworthosteopath.co.uk shows Tamworth Osteopaths prices information and treatment costs.

Appointments can be made by telephoning 01827 59943

Tamworth Osteopath success with the Sacroiliac Joint and Sacroiliitis in Staffordshire

Sunday, June 6th, 2010

Tamworth Osteopath considers lecturing on sacroiliac joint treatments because it is so common and often not understood.

Tamworth Osteopath John Williams successfully treats on average 4 patients daily with sacroiliitis, which is inflammation of the sacroiliac joint.

This is so common that over the 10 years in practice John and his Staffordshire team of osteopaths and physiotherapists have treated thousands of sacroiliac joints which can cause an immense amount of pain and suffering in the low back, groin and pelvic area. Patients from  Lichfield, Sutton Coldfield, Measham, Brownhills, Swadlincote and Burton on Trent travel for treatment.

The sacroiliac seems to be a joint that is not understood too well and seems difficult to diagnose.  Even after this problem has been identified practitioners appear to struggle in treating the problem quickly.  Often mistaken for disc prolapse, arthritic hip, sciatica and a variety of low back conditions the sacroiliac joint is a marvel of engineering and is complex in both function and movement.

At Atlas Pain Relief Centre in Tamworth, Staffordshire John has devised a treatment plan that works effectively and quickly on treating the pain and discomfort caused by sacroiliitis.  On average acute patients will be pain free in 4 treatments and occasionally it might take 6 visits to be resolved.

In 10 years of treating sacroiliac joints John has only failed to resolve 2 cases of this common problem which is a near 99% success rate.  Often patients present with acute pain which they have had for years and have often been receiving treatment elsewhere with no success.  Regardless they are successfully treated in the 6 treatments.

The problem with treating the sacroiliac joint is that firstly diagnosis by imaging is not effective.  A standard MRI scan will not show any signs of dysfunction or cause of pain in the joint.  Most sacroiliac joints are a problem caused by dysfunction and subsequent inflammation.

A scan is a static image and will appear normal when viewed, it is only when asked to perform movement that the problem will be obvious.  However, often patients present with no dysfunction in the joint itself and appear to be suffering symptoms of inflammation only.  This is where practitioners seem to struggle to treat the patient.

As a result of seeing so many patients that have been unsuccessfully treated elsewhere John is now considering using his lecturing skills to set up workshops and share his knowledge on how to successfully treat this problematic joint.

The Tamworth osteopath has a website www.tamworthosteopath.co.uk where you can view interesting articles on back pain and other common problems or appointments can be made by telephoning 01827 59943