Posts Tagged ‘low back pain’

Tamworth physiotherapist treats sacroiliac joint pain

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

Tamworth Physiotherapist John Williams of Atlas Pain Relief Centre has designed a unique physiotherapy treatment for sacroiliac joint pain.  Sacroiliitis is an inflammation of the sacroiliac joint and is often mistaken for low back pain.  Physiotherapy in Tamworth at the Atlas Pain Relief Centre is proving 99% successful in treating the condition in less than 6 visits.

For this unique Tamworth physiotherapy treatment you need to contact the pain relief clinic.  Tamworth physiotherapist John Williams has been visited by patients from Lincolnshire this week and many more travel a long distance to access this unique physiotherapy treatment for the sacroiliac joint.

Unlike Tamworth chiropractor and Tamworth osteopath treatment for the sacroiliac joint, the Atlas regime does not involve manipulation of the pelvis.

For more details contact reception on 01827 59943 or visit www.atlaspainrelief.co.uk

chiropractor, osteopath and physiotherapy compared by Tamworth Osteopath

Sunday, January 9th, 2011

Osteopath, Chiropractor or Physiotherapist, which one do i need, and what is the difference? This is a common question from members of the public and depending on who you ask you will probably get different answers. It is far easier to compare the similarities between them rather than the differences.

Firstly it is important to stress that this is my opinion based on experience of having worked alongside all professions. My name is John Williams, a GOsC registered Osteopath and HPC registered Physiotherapist.?I am Clinic Director of Atlas Pain Relief Centre based in Tamworth and Solihull. www.tamworthosteopath.co.uk

I begin by stating that all three professions treat the same patients, it is probably that each profession has a slightly different approach thats all. Within the professions you will get individuals with certain specialities that they have more experience in, and feel more comfortable with.

All three professions are regulated by their respective governing bodies and are highly trained. All three follow a recognised university degree programme. Physiotherapy can be either a 3 or 4 year programme of training whereas Osteopaths and Chiropractors cover a 5 year training programme.

Currently the Physiotherapists are found mostly within the NHS on completion of their training as they are the largest employers. Osteopaths and Chiropractors are mainly in private practice but will at some stage in the future i believe, be working within the NHS framework.

The training of each profession is slightly different but increasingly there appears to be more crossover.?For a long time Osteopaths and Chiropractors were performing High Velocity Thrusts (HVT’s) which is the cracking of backs and necks and requires much expertise. Now we see Physiotherapists training in this type of treatment, however i feel that many practitioners perform these techniques after short training workshops, and the lack of training in this area concerns me. Acupuncture is another similar workshop training that can produce practitioners with little experience. The public should, in my opinion, be informed of the length of training in this activity as poor results from an inexperienced practitioner can give the profession a bad name.

Physiotherapists are trained in electrotherapy and more Osteopaths and Chiropractors now use this form of treatment.

Chiropractors use the title “Doctor” in front of their name whereas Osteopaths refused this option as they felt the public may confuse them with GP’s. Most Chiropractors are not GP’s and are only using the title “Doctor of Chiropractic” The general public are confused about who does what and are told such a variety of answers to their questions they are understandably confused.

At Atlas Pain Relief Centre our aim is to be honest with our patients and put their welfare first.

Let us look at some of the comments and questions i am asked on a regular basis.

I am told i need an xray in order to see the condition and determine alignment of my spine! Well maybe if a fracture or pathology is suspected, but xrays are not good for you and shouldn’t be a routine procedure!.

There should be no need to pay for xrays as your GP will refer you for free. This can be done within no more than 2 weeks but if they consider it urgent then it can be done the same day.

After a conversation with the General Chiropractic Council, my understanding is that xrays that are taken by chiropractors become part of your case notes.  As such they are kept securely at their clinic and they will not give them to you because they are required to keep them.  However as you are entitled to copies of your case notes if you request them, chiropractors must supply you with a copy of the xray if you ask them.

There is a charge of up to £50 that can be made by the practitioner for the supply of your case notes which means that, should you agree to an xray from a chiropractor you will have to pay for the initial xray, plus should you require a copy of this xray you may have to pay another £50 to have a copy.  This has to be factored into the cost of receiving an xray at your chiropractors should you want a copy for your records or indeed wish to have a second opinion on the diagnosis you have been given.

If you consider that the NHS provide xrays via your GP for free then this may be a more cost effective route should you need xray imaging. Your GP should be able to advise you on the use of xrays.

.Your spine is out of alignment and needs a lot of treatment to get it back in line !

The human spine varies in shape and size between individuals and adapts to a variety of situations. To attempt to make a spine that is naturally different to become more traditional would only upset the harmony of the back and create more problems that you may already have. If your spine fails to function correctly then perhaps you may be experiencing a facet lock which is basically vertebrae getting stuck creating a restriction in movement and often accompanied with muscle spasm. You experienced practitioner should be capable of feeling this restriction and releasing it for you. If you find that you are told to keep returning for the same treatment, then question the treatment plan. Facet locks will not be evident via scans or xrays as they are a problem of function, in other words if you take a photograph of a door when closed, you wouldn’t be able to determine if it is stuck and fails to open would you!

Your pelvis is out of line or twisted You may experience a rotated ilia which refers to this condition however they are simple to adjust and should not need to be corrected more than a couple of times. If this continues to occur then there is an underlying problem which needs attention. Continual adjustments (cracking your back and neck) leads to hypermobile joints which will give you more problems. Some practitioners use the term “your pelvis is out, or misaligned” far too often, when in fact it may not be. What springs to mind here is “If your only tool is a hammer, you will always see the world as a nail”

If you get the same treatment everytime you go, then maybe it is a set routine you are getting and not customised for you. Chances are, everyone may be getting the same treatment as you, even though you all present with different problems.

Before any treatment takes place ask for a diagnosis. If they seem unsure then get another opinion. If you see no improvement in 4 treatments consider looking for a second opinion.

At Atlas we resolve most back and neck pain between 4 and 6 treatments and will educate patients on their condition, explaining via models of the spine what is wrong and how firstly we intend to correct the problem and more importantly how to prevent this from occuring again.

Finally, how much will it cost. This depends on individuals and location. Ask how long you will be getting for treatment and how much each session costs. When you have this information compare other professions for value. Ask yourself if you are only offered 10 mins per session ” am i on a production line and is this sufficient time to help me” £25 may be cheaper than £35 but if you compare 10 minutes to 30 minutes you can make value comparisons. The cheapest isn’t always the best and word of mouth recommendations are valuable”

If you would like any advice on back or neck problems then email info@atlaspainrelief.co.uk

Tamworth Osteopath at Atlas Pain Relief Centre offers an alternative back pain treatment to a Tamworth Chiropractor.

Sunday, January 9th, 2011

Tamworth Chiropractors, Tamworth Physiotherapists, Acupuncture and Sports Therapists all treat back pain.  At Atlas Pain Relief Centre in Lower Gungate, Tamworth town centre they offer a selection of back pain treatments from a variety of practitioners.

Atlas has Osteopaths, Physiotherapists, Acupuncture, Podiatrist and Sports Therapists working at the Tamworth Back Pain Relief Clinic.  There are no Tamworth Chiropractors however as Atlas believe they offer an alternative to the Tamworth Chiropractic clinics.

The approach between chiropractors and other back pain professions are generally different and Atlas prefer to allow patients and back pain sufferers the option to choose which style of treatment they prefer.

There is a comparison article on the differences between osteopaths, chiropractors and physiotherapists which can be found on the Atlas website www.tamworthosteopath.co.uk if you are interested in researching the different approaches to treatment that each profession offers for back pain.

Atlas treat back pain, low back pain and stiff necks.  All spinal problems are looked at in the Tamworth clinic. Neck and back pain although the most common condition is not the only thing that is treated.  Shoulder pain and knee pain is treated as are all musculo skeletal problems.

Sciatica and trapped nerve are often very painful and cause much distress however a bulging disc can be treated with the proper physiotherapy and recover.

Appointments at the Tamworth clinic can be made by telephoning 01827 59943

Tamworth Osteopaths treat sacroiliac joint inflammation.

Monday, June 14th, 2010

John Williams of Tamworth Osteopaths in Tamworth near Lichfield Staffordshire is often asked about sacroiliac joint problems.  Does physiotherapy from a physiotherapist help, does chiropractic treatment from a chiropractor help or does osteopathy from an osteopath help.  The answer is not the profession but in someone who understands the problem and has a successful record in treating this common condition.

What is the sacroiliac joint?

The sacroiliac joint can be found within the pelvic girdle.  We all have two sacroiliac joints which are positioned between the sacrum and the ilia.

As joints are named where bones meet each other, the sacroiliac joint gets its name from the sacrum (sacro) and Ilium (iliac) which can be found each side of your lower back.

The sacrum is a triangular shaped bone which forms the base of your spine and has 5 fused vertebrae.  The Ilium is a flat irregular shaped bone which is found on both left and right sides. At the front of the pelvic girdle the two ilium bones meet at the pubis symphysis.  At the rear the two ilium bones meet the sacrum at the two sacroiliac joints.

The bones of the pelvic girdle are held together by many ligaments but there is movement which occurs at the sacroiliac joints and the pubis symphysis.  As you can imagine when moving, the pelvic girdle comes under immense strain from the legs, which act like long levers.  The two sacroiliac joints at the back and pubis at the front act like expansion joints and dissipate the forces, allowing the bones of the pelvis to absorb the stress.  Without this the pelvis would fracture.

Sacroiliac Joint Function

The sacroiliac joint allows movement between bones of the pelvic girdle.  The movement is not extensive but enough to release the stress on the pelvis.

The sacrum is alleged to have 3 points of axis which enables it to move like a universal joint.  The adjacent SI Joints absorb this movement and allow the spine and pelvis to operate normally.  As the sacrum is wedged shape being thinner below and wider up above, it is designed to wedge between the 2 Ilias when requiring stability of the pelvis.

We therefore have a joint that needs to be able to lock and also move when required.  Take for example a door which has a function of closing and locking and on occasions when required it opens and swings on its hinges.  When the door is operating correctly everything is fine, but if the door sticks it may not be able to move as it should.  The sacroiliac joint is the same because its function is both to allow movement and when required restrict movement.

The problems occur when function is impaired and the SI sticks and gets jammed.

Sacroiliac Joint Inflammation

Sacroiliac joints seem to be prone to inflammation, either the adjacent ligaments can become stretched and inflamed or the joint itself seems to become painful and show signs of inflammation.  Inflammation of the sacroiliac joint is called “sacroiliitis”.   Inflammation is referred to as “itis” and can be found describing many inflammatory conditions.

It is unclear why inflammation of the SIJ occurs but one theory is that inflammation is triggered when the joint sticks and ligaments are stretched during movement.  It matters not what causes this problem as long as it can be resolved.

Symptoms of Sacroiliac Joint inflammation

SIJ symptoms vary in intensity and presentation.  Classic symptoms are:

One sided low back pain (occasionally it can change sides)

Pain when turning in bed

Pain rising from sitting

Pain swinging legs in and out of a car.

Groin pain (which can lead to testicle pain in men)

Radiating pain around the buttock and thigh

Occasionally the SIJ symptoms mimic sciatica which often leads to misdiagnosis.

Treatment of Sacroiliac Joints

Treating the SIJ involves two aspects.  Firstly treating the symptoms of pain and lack of mobility and secondly treating the cause.

Inflammation can be treated with ice and interferential electrotherapy, which is a machine often used by physiotherapists. Massage may make you feel better but will not improve the problem

The cause is more complex and can be from poor biomechanics, twisting and bending, trauma or indeed it can be a leg length difference.  This can cause a misaligned pelvis.

An examination is advised along with a biomechanical assessment to determine causative factors and then treatment can begin.

Atlas Pain Relief Centre in Tamworth and Solihull Birmingham have designed a specific treatment regime for problem sacroiliac joints and have success in less than 6 visits normally.

The  website www.tamworthosteopath.co.uk shows Tamworth Osteopaths prices information and treatment costs.

Appointments can be made by telephoning 01827 59943

Tamworth Osteopath success with the Sacroiliac Joint and Sacroiliitis in Staffordshire

Sunday, June 6th, 2010

Tamworth Osteopath considers lecturing on sacroiliac joint treatments because it is so common and often not understood.

Tamworth Osteopath John Williams successfully treats on average 4 patients daily with sacroiliitis, which is inflammation of the sacroiliac joint.

This is so common that over the 10 years in practice John and his Staffordshire team of osteopaths and physiotherapists have treated thousands of sacroiliac joints which can cause an immense amount of pain and suffering in the low back, groin and pelvic area. Patients from  Lichfield, Sutton Coldfield, Measham, Brownhills, Swadlincote and Burton on Trent travel for treatment.

The sacroiliac seems to be a joint that is not understood too well and seems difficult to diagnose.  Even after this problem has been identified practitioners appear to struggle in treating the problem quickly.  Often mistaken for disc prolapse, arthritic hip, sciatica and a variety of low back conditions the sacroiliac joint is a marvel of engineering and is complex in both function and movement.

At Atlas Pain Relief Centre in Tamworth, Staffordshire John has devised a treatment plan that works effectively and quickly on treating the pain and discomfort caused by sacroiliitis.  On average acute patients will be pain free in 4 treatments and occasionally it might take 6 visits to be resolved.

In 10 years of treating sacroiliac joints John has only failed to resolve 2 cases of this common problem which is a near 99% success rate.  Often patients present with acute pain which they have had for years and have often been receiving treatment elsewhere with no success.  Regardless they are successfully treated in the 6 treatments.

The problem with treating the sacroiliac joint is that firstly diagnosis by imaging is not effective.  A standard MRI scan will not show any signs of dysfunction or cause of pain in the joint.  Most sacroiliac joints are a problem caused by dysfunction and subsequent inflammation.

A scan is a static image and will appear normal when viewed, it is only when asked to perform movement that the problem will be obvious.  However, often patients present with no dysfunction in the joint itself and appear to be suffering symptoms of inflammation only.  This is where practitioners seem to struggle to treat the patient.

As a result of seeing so many patients that have been unsuccessfully treated elsewhere John is now considering using his lecturing skills to set up workshops and share his knowledge on how to successfully treat this problematic joint.

The Tamworth osteopath has a website www.tamworthosteopath.co.uk where you can view interesting articles on back pain and other common problems or appointments can be made by telephoning 01827 59943

Tamworth Osteopath recruits a new female Chartered Physiotherapist

Monday, May 31st, 2010

Tamworth osteopaths Atlas Pain Relief Centre in Lower Gungate Tamworth Staffordshire have secured the services of a new female musculo-skeletal physiotherapist.

Kelly Grove will be joining the Atlas team on June 19th 2010 and will be based at the Tamworth Back Pain Relief Clinic.  Kelly will be treating back pain and sports injuries and providing physiotherapy treatments and sports massage to Tamworth, Lichfield and Sutton Coldfield customers.

Kelly has experience working with Rugby League players from Featherstone Rovers Rugby League team and is currently first team physiotherapist for Birmingham Ladies football team.  Kelly will be adding acupuncture to her list of skills this summer too.

If you wish to find out more about back pain and suitable treatments then visit the website www.tamworthosteopath.co.uk or call for an appointment on 01827 59943

Welcome to Atlas Osteopaths Tamworth

Friday, January 15th, 2010

Atlas Osteopaths can be found at Atlas Pain Relief Centre in Lower Gungate Tamworth town centre.  Just opposite the Globe pub and with plenty of car parks close by, the Tamworth back pain clinic will treat patients locally from Tamworth, Lichfield and Sutton Coldfield Birmingham.

Informative articles and news stories from the Atlas team of Osteopaths, Physiotherapists, Sports Massage Therapists and Acupuncture practitioners will follow.

Wishing you all a prosperous 2011 from all the team at Atlas.

Back pain explained and treated by Tamworth Osteopath

Back pain explained and treated by Tamworth Osteopath